Sound Radio Easter Bee Watch


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Bees and other insects are a litmus test for our environment; fresh air, clean water, non-toxic land and diverse season round forage produces bees and other insects. In my garden over this 2019 warm and sunny Easter weekend a short look finds a number of species and events.  Take Ceanothus the blue flower with tiny pollen stamen topped with yellow pollen.

 

Honey bee collecting pollen on her legs
Honey bee collecting pollen on her legs

Butterflies, honey bees, solitary bees, hover flies and others feed on Ceanothus and other plants at this time of year; we can all see these any time its dry and warm, photographing them takes a bit of time but when we get a clear shot it is more revealing than a glancing view in real time.

A succession of diverse forage emerges in the spring; insects feed themselves and their young on nectar and pollen, and other plant substances, in the process they pollinate plants which produce berries and fruit for birds and insects also form part of the food chain being predated by larger insects and birds.

The following cross section of Easter 2019 garden photos takes just a few plant species delivering forage just now; already most plum and pear blossom is gone with Sycamore just starting, Apple under way and May thorn emerging.    

Tree Bumble Bee on Ceanothus
Tree Bumble Bee on Ceanothus
If it’s good for bees
If it’s good for bees
Solitary bee gathers pollen
Solitary bee gathers pollen
Small hover fly
Foraging on Apple blossom
Foraging on Apple blossom
Many ornamental flowers are rarely visited by bees but here she takes pollen from Clematis
Cherry
Cherry
Male Robin feeding his mate insects as she develops eggs
Honey bees at the hive, they consume and store nectar (energy) and pollen (protein).

 

Barry Griffiths

22 April 2019

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